As of December, 2009, this blog is inactive at this location. All posts have been transferred to the new location here. You are very welcome to read and comment.

Sunday, June 19, 2005

It's my party and I'll cry if I want to

Well, no need to cry, and no party either, but I turn 22 today, and just felt like saying so.

Now, where's the gin?

(walks off, muttering to self).

17 comments:

Benjamin Andersen said...

Happy Birthday! God grant you many years! Have fun with the Psalter!

Michael said...

Thank you! And I shall. Have a happy and holy Pentecost.

Ian said...

Happy Birthday Michael! Many, many years.

And congratulations on the wonderful Psalter and Felicity!

* raises glass of gin *

Anonymous said...

Happy Birthday, Michael, and Happy Pentecost!

Leetle M.

Mark said...

Happy Birthday, dear.
Have some gin for me. ;-)

Richard said...

Happy Birthday - I knew it was sometime soon, but couldn't remember exactly when. Sorry.

Elizabeth said...

Happy Birthday, and Many Years !
Felicity is really cute :-)

Michael said...

Thank you, everybody!

Ian and Elizabeth, I really like Felicity. She is sitting on the window sill at the moment, now that the sun has died down a little, to get some daylight.

Mark, I believe there is gin aplenty at your residence. (At least, I hope so). ;-)

Don't be sorry, Richard. Thanks so much for the message.

A happy Pentecost back at you Leetle M, and to all who celebrate the Feast today. The temperature here was certainly in keeping with the fire of the Holy Spirit. We saw 30 degrees today! Thank God for the thunderstorms later on in the day.

Michael.

Mark said...

Yes, the gin is still here. I will bring it when I'm next in your neck of the woods.

Barnabas said...

All this gin drinking!

There will soon be more gin in your body than blood. hehe

Anonymous said...

Well, at some point you need to allow a little blood back into the alcohol stream...

Anyhow, I didn't realise it was your birthday, so a slightly belated "Happy Birthday" to you, and I hope the year ahead brings much happiness.

I found an old plainsong psalter sitting around in our choir vestry a few weeks ago and had a wonderful half hour singing from it (and quietly drooling). Enjoy your St Dunstans Psalter (I'm feeling ever so slightly envious of you!)

kingsfold

The young fogey said...

Joining in here: all the best today and always.

Michael said...

Thank you all again.

Thanks as well for the carfds and prezzies. Much loved and appreciated. I'll post more soon.

M x

Ian said...

My congratulations on a most wonderful Mystery Worshipper report, which I've just read on Ship of Fools. If ever I return to Edinburgh for a visit, I think I shall have to drop by that church.

Out of curiousity, could you point me to a website (or describe yourself) traditions that existed in England prior to "the continental imports". I've always crossed myself at the end of the Creed and genuflected, and never thought twice about them [though Australia's Catholic Christianity probably hasn't developed as much a tradition as other places due to its short existence]. I'd be interested to learn of the more British practices. Thanks, and again -- a great report!

Michael said...

Ian, thank you so much! I'm glad you enjoyed the report.

I must dash off to work now, but I shall post here about this later today. I cannot be certain, but I believe it is Aristibule's blog that has a wealth of helpful information on the Sarum and other British Catholic rites in the archives of his blog.

I'll post more later, but the ceremonial in the rites of York and Sarum (the latter of which spread to most of the English south, Ireland and Scotland) was to bow at the end of the Creed, during the line "and the life of the world to come" and to offer a profound bow (from the waist) as a reverence to the Most Blessed Sacrament. The genuflexion (or 'dropping to one knee', as Blessed Percy Dearmer described it) was continental.

More to come later.

Joe said...

a belated Mnohya Lita to your birthday.

Joe Zollars

Mark said...

By the way, I don't doubt that the genuflexion is continental, but do you think it could have roots also in the same place as kneeling like that for, say, knighthood?